CFP

CALL FOR PAPER - SPECIAL ISSUES

cfp - 1 | The Narrative Identity of European Cities in Contemporary Literature [proposal submission closed]

cfp - 2 | Living, Creating, Storytelling and Writing in the Middle Ages [proposal submission closed] 

cfp - 3 | Melville, Media, and Narratives [proposal submission open] 

cfp - 4 | Geopolitics and the Anthropocene: Examining the Implications of Climate Change in the narratives of Global South [proposal submission open] 

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cfp - 1 | The Narrative Identity of European Cities in Contemporary Literature [proposal submission closed]

Writing Urban Places – European COST Action CA18126    CFP (NALANS)

The Narrative Identity of European Cities in Contemporary Literature

cfp

 

The Narrative Identity of European Cities in Contemporary Literature

Drawing on Paul Riccoeur’s theory of identity being considered in terms of narrative identity (Time and Narrative, 1984–88), one can argue that a city as a built and designed environment represents an entity that over time establishes a certain narrative identity that comes alive as a protagonist of its own ever-changing fiction. 

The special issue of NALANS aims to give room to explore the urban narrative identities of European cities as they have been written in contemporary literature. In this call, we would like to define the term ‘contemporary’ as fiction that has been published in the last 20 years. The issue thus wishes to explore 21st-century fiction, playwriting and poetry that features the city as its (main) protagonist and as an element equally important as, if not even more than, its characters in the traditional sense. In doing so, we invite the submission of articles that place particular emphasis on urban narratives of cities or city neighbourhoods that have often been overlooked until now, such as mid-sized European cities to explore their multiple narrative identities arising from but not limited to chronicles, generational novels, travel writing and other forms of literary texts.  

Further emphasis of the articles should be placed on the discourse and the language this identity is created by. Roland Barthes (1976) argues that "[a]t the moment of speech’s utterance, language finds itself at the service of power on two levels. On one level, speech is immediately assertive and demonstrative of authority. On another level, speech seeks to be recognized by the other and finds this in the repetition of signs." Thus, we would like to receive studies that investigate further to what extent does the city itself speak, possibly through the author of its urban narrative? 

We thus encourage scholars to submit papers of 5.000 to 7.000 words that investigate the following topics that are not by any means exclusive:

  • - how the city speaks in urban narratives and how is its narrative identity shaped (by language, discourse, geography, timeline, content, text from etc.)
  • - what function do memories and recollection of the past and present of a city have in shaping its narrative identity
  • - investigations into the epistemology of urban writings
  • - how do the urban narrative form a collective identity of the community and brings the members together?
  • - urban places that are crucial in creating the narrative identity of a certain city (e.g. built heritage sites that speak such as hotels, cinemas, museums, historic cafes, statues, fountains, bridges, gardens, old universities, authors’/artists’ houses etc.) in literature
  • - descriptions of events that shape the narrative identity of a city (incorporated narratives of national and international festivals, theatres, exhibitions, art installations, and fairs, routes, performances) in literary works
  • - novels/plays/poetry thematizing the architecture, art history, urban development, urban design and planning

 

We invite submissions in form of abstracts of approx. 300 words to be submitted to wg2.wup@gmail.com no later than 15th January 2022. After an initial review of abstracts by the editors of the special issue, selected authors will be invited to contribute full-length (5.000-7.000 words) original research articles written according to APA 7th edition and adhering to standard NALANS guidelines for authors that can be found here guidelines https://www.nalans.com/index.php/nalans/about/submissions . The deadline for full articles is 15th April 2022.  For an extension request, please contact Sonja Novak at wg2.wup@gmail.com . The issue is expected to come out by the end of 2022.

NALANS (ISSN: 2148-4066), the Journal of Narrative and Language Studies is a peer-reviewed journal published by Karadeniz Technical University, with Editor-in-Chief Mustafa Zeki Çıraklı. The Journal is indexed in SCOPUS, MLA International Bibliography, DOAJ, The Linguist List, Google Scholar, DRJY, ASOS, Academic Resource Index, Turkish Education Index, SOBIAD. All other important information on the Journal can be found here: https://www.nalans.com/index.php/nalans/index  

 

Issue Editors

Sonja Novak 

Mustafa Zeki Çıraklı 

Asma Mehan

Sílvia Quinteiro 

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CFP - 2 - Call for contributions for a special issue of Jornal of Narrative and Language Studies

Living, Creating, Storytelling and Writing in the Middle Ages

 
The physical, political and social confines for many countries today were recognized in the Middle Ages. The Middle Ages is acknowledged for the Crusades, the Black Death, the Peasant Revolt and the Hundred Years War, monumental events of history, which entirely altered the hue of the world. The period is also known for the rise of universities and influential writers reflecting upon their time. Although the era is accepted to come to an end with the beginning of the Renaissance, it was the Middle Ages when this rebirth was triggered by the same period itself. Leading medieval thinkers, writers and artists produced copious peerless works on literary, historical and artistic grounds, which are still the source of inspiration for scholars worldwide. 
 
The special issue of NALANS aims to give room to explore the living, creating and writing in the Middle Ages in every respect. In doing so, we invite the submission of articles that lay particular emphasis on medieval productions, including but not limited to literary texts, chronicles and artworks. 
 
The goal of the special issue is to promote serious scholarly investigation into engaging topics from in all disciplines of Medieval Studies. We thus encourage scholars to submit papers of 5.000 to 7.000 words that investigate the Middle Ages. In this general framework, the topic of the issue covers but is not limited to the following topics: 
-Medieval Romances 
-Medieval Dream Vision Poetry 
-Neo-medievalism 
-Medieval Manuscripts 
-Medieval Churches 
-Medieval Chronicles 
-Medieval Artworks 
-Medieval History 
-Medieval Plays 
-Medieval Frame Tales 
-Medieval Identity 
-Medieval Women and Gender Studies 
We invite submissions in form of abstracts of approx.
 
300 words to be submitted to nyildiz@ktu.edu.tr no later than 30th December 2021.
 
After an initial review of abstracts by the editors of the special issue, selected authors will be invited to contribute full-length 
(5.000-7.000 words) original research articles written according to APA 7th edition and adhering to standard NALANS guidelines for authors that can be found here guidelines https://www.nalans.com/index.php/nalans/about/submissions. The deadline for full articles is 1st February 2022. The issue is expected to come out by the end of March 2022.
 
Issue Editors
Burçin Erol
Carl G. Martin
Huriye Reis
Jacob Blakesley
Mustafa Zeki Çıraklı
Contact Editor
Nazan Yıldız

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cfp - 3 | Melville, Media, and Narratives [abstract proposal submission opened] 

Special Issue CfP:  Journal of Narrative and Language Studies

“Melville, Media, and Narratives”

In 1983 Leland R. Phelps, a German Studies professor at Duke University, published the first survey of Melville’s critical reception outside of the United States. His book Herman Melville’s Foreign Reputation not only examines critical works on Melville but also lists editions, translations, and adaptations to assess Melville’s impact on artists and writers in other countries. Highlighting the cultural importance of Melville’s growing reputation, Phelps adds“[p]lays, opera librettos, motion pictures, and radio presentations based on works by Melville”, arguing that “[s]uch adaptations can tell us something about another people from another cultural background and they may even tell us something we had not known about the works themselves” (Phelps xx).

In addition to attracting a great deal of critical study, Melville’s multifaceted narratives from Typee (1846) to Billy-Budd, Sailor (1891/1924) have been creatively reinterpreted, reproduced, retold, reenvisioned, and revisited in narrative-based, cinematic, multimodal, intermedial realms.

This special issue on Melville’s oeuvre aims to provide a critical and reflective space for authors and scholars to share their original and insightful research. We invite papers that provide cutting-edge methodologies in the study of Melville, media, and narratives exploring, among other aspects, what John Bryant in “Textual Identity and Adaptive Revision: Editing Adaptation as a Fluid Text” calls “the critical distances between and among adaptive versions” (Bryant 49; emphasis in the orginal).

Theorizing and analyzing Melville’s narratives within a mediatized context of twentieth- and twenty-first-century global cultural productions, such as films, the performance arts, paintings, music clips, etc., this special issue seeks to trace creative, distorting, mimetic, as well as experimental responses to Melville’s revived narrative legacy. Thus, we welcome articles that deal with such productions and reproductions by employing the methodologies of narrative studies, language studies, and media studies.

We encourage scholars to submit papers of 6.000 to 7.000 words that investigate the following topics that are not by any means exclusive:

-What narratological and cultural insights do we gain from translations of Melville’s works?

-Which cultural, medial, and narrative processes have gone into the popularization of Melville’s works?  

-From which narrative and cultural perspectives (e.g., moral/philosophical, ecological, ethnic, feminist viewpoints) have Melville’s narratives been retold?

-Which narratives, including suppressed subtexts, have (re-)surfaced in adaptations of Melville’s works?

-For which audiences have Melville’s works been creatively reinterpreted, reproduced, retold, reenvisioned, and revisited?

-To what extent can editions, translations, and adaptations reveal Melville’s impact on artists?

 -How do cinematic interactions (movies, films, series, advertisements and other media productions) with Melville’s works highlight the verbosity of the nineteenth-century author? (e.g., in John Huston’s adaptation of Moby-Dick). 

-How are Melville’s works explicitly reinterpreted within the digital realm (e.g., computer games, animated short films, digital-born artwork, social media)?

-What is the creative appeal of Melville’s narratives as reinterpreted, reproduced, retold, reenvisioned, and revisited in twentieth- and twenty-first centuries (popular) media?

-What cultural, medial, and narratological insights into Melville’s works do we gain from creative, distorting, mimetic, and experimental transformations?

We invite submissions in form of abstracts of approximately 300 words to be submitted to nalans.com no later than 30 June, 2022. After an initial review of abstracts by the editors of the special issue, selected authors will be invited to contribute full-length (6.000-7.000 words) original research articles written according to APA 7th edition and adhering to standard NALANS guidelines for authors, which can be found here:

https://www.nalans.com/index.php/nalans/about/submissions

The issue is expected to come out by March 2023.

Journal of Narrative and Language Studies, NALANS (ISSN: 2148-4066), is a peer-reviewed journal published by Karadeniz Technical University, with Editor-in-Chief Mustafa Zeki Çıraklı. The journal is indexed in SCOPUS, MLA International Bibliography, DOAJ, The Linguist List, Google Scholar, DRJY, ASOS, Academic Resource Index, Turkish Education Index, SOBIAD. All other important information on the journal can be found here

https://www.nalans.com/index.php/nalans/index

Issue Editors

Martina Pfeiler

Don Dingledine

Kyle Meikle

Paolo Simonetti

Mustafa Zeki Çıraklı

Proposals (abstracts) should be sent to melvillemedianarratives@gmail.com no later than 30 June, 2022.

Contact Issue Editors:Martina Pfeiler & Mustafa Zeki Çıraklı

 

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cfp - 4 | Geopolitics and the Anthropocene: Examining the Implications of Climate Change in the narratives of Global South [proposal submission open] 

Call for papers for a special issue of Journal of Narrative and Language Studies

The term ‘Anthropocene,’ which refers to the current geological epoch resulting from the escalation of anthropogenic activities, has sparked much debate since its proclamation by Paul J. Crutzen in 2000. Crutzen argues that the beginning of the Anthropocene coincides with the beginning of the fossil fuel energy regime in the late eighteenth century (Crutzen 2000). In other words, the onset of the Anthropocene marks an increase in the carbon concentration in the atmosphere, eventually contributing to global warming. Anthropocene, the human-dominated geological epoch, arguably tied with the fossil fuel extractions, calls for the convergence of natural and human capitalist histories (Chakrabarty 2016). The capitalist history indicates an imperial past that has thrived on fossil fuel extraction from the Asian and African colonies. The flourishing of the empire at the expense of the environmental health of the colonised has created an ecological divide between the imperial power holders and their subjects. There is no significant change in the present scenario given the expansion of the neo-colonial regime of the Global North that exploits the ‘extraction ecologies’ (Miller 2021) and ‘resource cursed’ (Nixon 2010) nations of the Global South.

Critics argue that the poor and other dispossessed communities are relatively more vulnerable to the current climate change than those capitalist states that primarily contribute to it. The European and American powers’ politics of de-nationalising the resources of the decolonised nations has created an opportunity for the Global North multinationals to exploit the resources of the Global South, thereby damaging the immediate ecology of those countries. Such a divisive and exploitive scenario calls for the assignment of the epoch as ‘Capitalocene’, the “geology of capital accumulation” (Malm 2016), instead of ‘Anthropocene,’ meaning the ‘geology of mankind’. The term ‘Capitalocene’ points to the economic divide between the developed Global North and the developing Global South and the climate change-related inequitable experiences of the two economically divided parts of the globe. The geographical peculiarity of the Global South, with its remnants of the colonial past, requires an assessment of the anthropogenic ecological degradation contextualised within the geopolitics of the Global North and the Global South.

Thus, the special issue of the Journal of Narrative and Language Studies aims to introspect into the politics of unequal human agency and its resultant consequences related to climate change in the literature of the Global South.

In this issue, we would like to place a particular emphasis on the ‘Anthropocene fictions’ (Trexler 2015) produced within the literary culture of the Global South, addressing the problems of the present climate crisis and speculating on the future in order to understand “what anthropogenic climate change is and how long its effects may last” (Chakrabarty 2016). In doing so, we invite abstracts that will explore the varied implications of ‘Anthropocene’/ ‘Capitalocene’ through the literary practises of the Global South, emphasising the issues related to climate refugees, eco-cultural calamities, environmental justice, citizenship, human-nonhuman interrelationship, dispossession of indigenous communities, and capitalism versus climate and island vulnerability. Thus, the special issue intends to invite submissions making theoretical and literary investigations into the multifaceted ‘Anthropocene’, particularly contextualised in the Global South, demanding keen representation within the climate change discourses. In this upcoming issue, we also seek to examine the role of the authorial voices from the Global South in explicating the dire, dreadful and drastic climatic conditions of the region concerning geopolitics and aim at presenting alternative environmental historiography of the Global South.

We invite scholars to submit abstracts/paper proposals that address the following (but not limited to) issues contextualised in the narratives and discourses of the Global South:

  • The critique of human agency in the Anthropocene
  • The critique of unequal human agency in the Capitalocene
  • Capitalism and climate change
  • Environmental justice and citizenship
  • Indigenous communities and the climate crisis
  • Speculative fiction and climate change
  • Human-nonhuman interrelationship
  • Fossil fuel energy regime and ‘extraction ecologies’
  • Ecological and cultural calamities
  • Postcolonial ecology and climate change
  • Graphic narratives and climate change
  • Racism and speciesism
  • Island ecology and the Anthropocene

The abstracts (300 words) should be submitted to specialissuegk@gmail.com no later than March 31st, 2022.

Intimation of the selection of abstracts: 15 April 2022

After an initial review of abstracts by the editors of the special issue, selected authors will be invited to contribute full-length (6.000–7000 words) articles written according to APA 7th edition and adhering to standard NALANS guidelines for authors that can be found here: https://www.nalans.com/index.php/nalans/about/submissions. The deadline for submission of full articles is June 30, 2022. This issue is expected to come out in October 2022.

NALANS (ISSN: 2148-4066), the Journal of Narrative and Language Studies is a double-blind peer-reviewed journal published by Karadeniz Technical University, with Editor-in-Chief Mustafa Zeki Çıraklı. The Journal is indexed in SCOPUS, MLA International Bibliography, DOAJ, The Linguist List, Google Scholar, DRJY, ASOS, Academic Resource Index, Turkish Education Index, SOBIAD. All other important information on the Journal can be found here: https://www.nalans.com/index.php/nalans/index 

Issue editors

Goutam Karmakar

Somasree Sarkar

Mustafa Zeki Çıraklı